Archive

Monthly Archives: September 2013

We’ll be looking these up, discussing, debating and problematizing them too.  How many do you know about?  I mean really know about?  Asterisked terms are a special priority.

  • ACLU
  • Affirmative Action
  • *AIDS
  • Allende, Salvador
  • Amnesty International
  • *Anarchism
  • Anti-Semitism
  • Apartheid
  • Arab Nationalism
  • *Arab-Israeli Conflict
  • Arafat, Yasser
  • Arms Control
  • Arms Race
  • Authoritarianism
  • *Balance of Power
  • Balkans
  • Bay of Pigs Invasion
  • *Bill of Rights
  • Bolivar, Simon
  • Bosnian War
  • Britain
  • Buddhism
  • Bureaucracy
  • Cabinet Government
  • Capital Punishment
  • *Capitalism
  • Castro, Fidel
  • Censorship
  • Central Intelligence Agency
  • Chile
  • China
  • Chinese Revolution
  • Churchill, Winston
  • Citizenship
  • *Civil Disobedience
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Civil Society
  • Class and Politics
  • *Collectivization
  • Colonial Powers
  • Commonwealth of Nations
  • *Communism
  • *Communitarianism
  • Comparative Politics
  • Confucianism
  • *Conservatism
  • Corporatism
  • Crimes Against Humanity
  • Cultural Revolution
  • Decolonization
  • *Democracy
  • Deregulation
  • Deterrence
  • *Development and Underdevelopment
  • Disability Rights
  • Disarmament
  • Due Process
  • Eisenhower Doctrine
  • Entitlements
  • Environmentalism
  • *Equality and Inequality
  • Ethnic Cleansing
  • European Union
  • Fanon, Frantz
  • *Feminism
  • Film
  • Finance, International
  • Foreign Aid
  • Foreign Policy
  • Foreign Workers
  • Franco, Francisco
  • French Revolution
  • *Fundamentalism
  • Gandhi, Mohandas
  • *Gender and Politics
  • Genocide
  • German Unification
  • *Globalization
  • Gorbachev, Mikhail
  • Great Society
  • Group of Seven
  • Haile Selasse
  • *Hegemony
  • Hiroshima
  • Hitler, Adolph
  • Ho Chi Minh
  • Holocaust
  • Human Development Index
  • *Human Rights
  • Human Trafficking
  • *Idealism
  • Ideology
  • Imperialism
  • India
  • *Indigenous Peoples
  • Information Society
  • Intellectual Property
  • Intelligence
  • *Interest Groups
  • International Cooperation
  • International Monetary Fund
  • International Relations
  • Intervention
  • Intifada
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Islam
  • *Isolationism
  • Israel
  • Jihad
  • Keynesianism
  • Labor Movement
  • Land Reform
  • Landmines
  • *League of Nations
  • *Left
  • Legislature
  • Leninism
  • *Liberalism
  • Liberation Theology
  • *Libertarianism
  • Malcolm X
  • Mao Zedong
  • Marshall Plan
  • Marx, Karl
  • *Marxism
  • May, 1968
  • Media
  • Media Politics
  • Medicare and Medicaid
  • *Mercantilism
  • Middle East
  • Military Rule
  • Minority Rights
  • *Modernity
  • *Monetarism
  • Multiculturalism
  • Multinational Corporations
  • *Nationalism
  • Nationalization
  • NATO
  • New Deal
  • *New Left
  • *New Right
  • NGO’s
  • Nicaragua
  • Northern Ireland
  • OAS
  • OPEC
  • *Palestine
  • *Parliamentary Democracy
  • Patriarchy
  • Peace Movement
  • Perestroika
  • Pinochet, Augusto
  • PLO
  • *Pluralism
  • *Political Economy
  • *Political Science
  • Post-Modernism
  • Power
  • Prague Spring
  • *Privatization
  • *Public Good
  • Race and Racism
  • *Realism
  • Reform
  • Refugees
  • Religion and Politics
  • Reproductive Politics
  • *Revolution
  • *Right
  • Right to Work
  • Roe V. Wade
  • Roman Catholic Church
  • *Rule of Law
  • Russian Revolution
  • Secularization
  • Security
  • Self Determination
  • *Separation of Powers
  • Slavery
  • *Social Capital
  • *Socialism and Social Democracy
  • Solidarity
  • Solzhenitsyn, Alexandr
  • *Sovereignty
  • Soviet Union
  • Spanish Civil War
  • Stalinism
  • State
  • *Sustainable Development
  • *Taxes and Taxation
  • Terrorism
  • Thatcherism
  • *Third World
  • Tibet
  • Timor
  • Torture
  • *Totalitarianism
  • Treaty
  • *Underclass
  • United Nations
  • United States
  • Vietnam
  • War
  • War Crimes
  • Warsaw Treaty Organization
  • Watergate
  • *Welfare
  • Welfare State
  • West Bank and Gaza
  • *Women
  • Women and Health
  • World Health Organization

Here’s the class schedule for this fall’s documentary theory/history class.  This time we’re going to be more pointedly political, to see if we can’t start participating more effectively in democratic, critical and citizenly conversations.

TMA 293, Fall 2013: Documentary and Non-Fiction Film

Course Objective:

To watch and enjoy a lot of non-fiction films.  To consider the idea of the nonfiction film from its beginning to the present day; to explore a range of approaches, styles, institutions and individuals associated with the documentary idea; to consider some of the social, political and ethical issues that have informed the documentary, and that emerge out of the making and viewing of documentary films; finally, to consider how our own lives (as film makers, film critics, and simple citizens) are or ought to be informed and shaped by documentary sensibilities.

Required Texts:

Print:

Documentary, by Erik Barnouw, 2nd revised ed.

Introduction to Documentary, by Bill Nichols, 2nd ed.

On-line:

Encyclopedia of Human Rights, ed. David P. Forsythe, OUP, 2009

Encyclopedia of Politics, ed. Rodney P. Carlisle, Sage, 2005

Gale Opposing Viewpoints in Context

Oxford Companion to the Politics of the World, 2nd ed., ed. Joel Krieger:, OUP, 2004

Week 1: THE DISCOURSE OF SOBRIETY/DOCS ARE FUN!

Screen: Please Vote for Me (2007)

Week 2: RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM & POLITICAL PLURALISM; SELF & OTHER

Screen: Control Room (2004)

Week 3: OPPOSITION IN ALL THINGS: INTEGRITY, ENMITY & DIALECTIC; “HOLD, AS ‘TWERE, A MIRROR UP TO NATURE”

Screen: Law and Order (1969)

Week 4: CAPITAL & COLLECTIVE: PRIVATE ENTERPRISE & PUBLIC WORKS 

Screen: The Living Desert (1953); Waiting for Fidel (1974)

Week 5: IDEALISM, REALISM, COLONIALISM; THE CREATIVE TREATMENT OF ACTUALITY

Screen: One Sixth of the World (1926); The Fog of War (2003)

Week 6: DEVELOPMENT & UNDERDEVELOPMENT; EXPOSITION, INVESTIGATION & IDEOLOGY

Screen: Harvest of Shame (1960)

Week 7MULTIPLY & REPLENISH; PEER REVIEW

Screen: The 11th Hour (2007)

Week 8: CONSERVATISIM & LIBERALISM: CINEMA VERITE

Screen: Chronicle of a Summer (1961); first film responses due

Week 9: RACE & CLASS & ACCESS; CHALLENGE FOR CHANGE

Screen: Circle of the Sun (1961); You Are On Indian Land (1969)

Week 10: THE PERSONAL VOICE

Screen: The Stories We Tell 

Week 11: HISTORY & EDUCATION, CITIZENSHIP & SUBJECT MATTER

Screen: Toute le Memoire du Monde (1956); The Act of Killing (2012)

Week 12: PERFORMANCE & THE AESTHETIC IMPULSE

Screen: Pina (2011)

Week 13: HYBRIDIZATION; AMERICAN THANKSGIVING

Screen: Strangers in Good Company (1990)

Week 14: LIBERTY, EQUALITY, FRATERNITY: THE INTEGRATION OF DOCUMENTARY MODES

Screen: Nostalgia for the Light (2010); last film responses due

Week 15: PROPAGANDA, ADVOCACY & TRUTH; NON-INSTITUTIONAL DOCUMENTARY 

Screen: Home Movies (2012); last political terms papers due

TMA 498, FALL 2013

TOPICS IN THE MEDIA ARTS: GREAT (SHORT) FILMS

CLASS OBJECTIVE: we intend to look at the way that media and culture industries sort of push us into certain commercially-derived or dominated patterns of thought and action, to look at ways that there might be some substance and sincerity to all this, and finally to get around all that’s dubious and frivolous and start making our own connections.  Imposed and unconsidered Ideas of Greatness can make the big boys a lot of money, obscure important conversations, and get all Romantic and sloppy.  Carefully considered and contextualized Ideas of Greatness also allow us to establish a set of hard, definable, even incontrovertible criteria or standards of judgment.  Far from diminishing the moments of pleasure, an expanded set of critical tools will leave us amazed by the abundance we’ve been blinking our way past.

This is a second, alternative edition of the Great Films class.  We have previously, profitably, keyed on the feature film.  This emphasis gets us a long way down the road, uncovering practical infinities of possibility and profundity.  But this emphasis is also, in some ways, quite limiting.  Commercial feature films, the art cinema, even the feature documentary are really the tip of the cinematic iceberg; there is more to movies than has been dreamed of in our philosophies, or touched upon by our viewing itineraries.  We will watch nearly 150 complete films this semester.  We will explore ancient films and their allegedly defunct methods, avant-garde and amateur sensibilities, as well as some of the patterns being established through new possibilities in distribution and exhibition.  For all the things that we do know, it may turn out that we may don’t know very much after all.  Prepare for what may be an unprecedented immersion, challenge, expansion…

WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION

View: Zabriskie Point; Moonbird, Introduction to Fogo Island, Runaway, The Dante Quartet; Jeu, The Magician and the Cavern, Organism, Village of Idiots

WEEK 2: ANARCHY

View: Daisies; A Bear for Punishment, The Cat Came Back, Fat and Lean Wrestling Match, The Bricklayers, The Colonel’s Account, A Very Fine Lady, The Fireman, For Better or Worser, The Band Concert, Pardon My Scotch

Read: Milton, Areopagitica

WEEK 3: ACTUALITY

View: Blood of the Beasts; Miss Dundee and her Performing Dogs, Barcelona by Tram, Moscow Clad in Snow, Bronx Morning, Daybreak Express, The Children of Fogo Island; Kings Cross, Bowling, Maligne Canyon, July 4th

Read: Plato, Apology

WEEK 4: ADVOCACY

View: Now!, Two Solutions to One Problem, Coal Face, A Colour Box, Rainbow Dance, Housing Problems, Trade Tattoo, Churchill’s Island, Lounge Chair, Shock Doctrine: Disaster Capitalism, Our Town Faro

Read:  Thoreau, On Civil Disobedience

WEEK 5: INTERLUDE—SILENT COMEDY

View: Behind the Screen, The Cook, The Scarecrow, Haunted Spooks, Mighty Like a Moose, Fiddlesticks, Liberty, Happy Anniversary

Read: Rousseau, Discourse on the Arts and Sciences

WEEK 6: THINGS 

View:  Toccata for Toy Trains; Cracking Contraptions, This Too Shall Pass, Mouse Heaven, The Home Where No Man Rests, The Night Before Christmas, Have You Got Any Castles?, La Grande Revue Philips, Toute la Mémoire du Monde, Renaissance, A Game with Stones, Tops

Read: Benjamin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

WEEK 7: SPACE, TIME, IMAGE

View: Nothing Compares 2 U, Let Forever Be, What is Home Without the Boarder?, The Cook in Trouble, The Old Mill, At Land, Go! Go! Go!, Du Cote de la Cote, La Jetée

Read: Emerson, Beauty

WEEK 8: EDUCATION

View:  St. Mathurin’s School of Practical Joking, Auteur, Here Comes Science, The Struggle for Survival, Around the World with Orson Welles, Elgar, Paddle to the Sea

Read:  Lessing, The Education of the Human Race

WEEK 9: RHYTHM/MOVEMENT; ABSTRACTION

View:   Pilala, Pierrette’s Escapades, Ten Ladies in an Umbrella, Skeleton Dance, “Lullaby of Broadway,” Dance in the Sun, Rabbit Moon, Shake! Otis at Monterey, Ballet Adagio

Colour Flight, Santa’s Workshop, H2O, An Optical Poem, Glen Falls Sequence, Begone, Dull Care, Blacktop, Garden of Earthly Delights, Le Chant du Syrene, Synchromy, Animated Motion

Read: Shlovski, Art as Technique

WEEK 10: SURREALISM, SUBJECTIVITY

View:  The Rabbit of Seville, Dough for the Do-Do, Krek, Dom; Shattered, Meshes in the             Afternoon, The Way to Shadow Garden, The Flat, Thanatopsis, Film

Read: Breton, What is Surrealism?

WEEK 11: INDEPENDENCE

View:  Hoagies, films of William Wegman, The Voice of the Nightingale, Autumn Fire, Rose Hobart, Family Portrait

Read: Morris, Useful Work vs. Useless Toil, Orwell, On Gandhi

WEEK 12: PARABLES

View:  Bread and Alley, Little and Big, Duck Dodgers in the 24th ½ Century, Gerald McBoing-Boing, Ersatz, Fast and Furryous, Act Without Words I, Punch and Judy, The Hand, The Promethean, Dinner for Two

Read: Pope, An Essay on Criticism

WEEK 13:  AMERICAN THANKSGIVING

WEEK 14: OBSCURITY AND THE OTHER

View:  Once in a Lifetime, The Spider and the Fly, The Vampire, Choose Your Weppins, Eskimo Artist: Kenojuak, Kurelek, Elegie de Chiac, Talking Heads, Peter and the  Wolf

Read:  Trollope, Aboriginals, Lessing, The Parable of the Three Rings

Final paper due.

WEEK 15: CINEMA DIRECT/PASSION PLAYS

View:  Coffee and Cigarettes, The Case of Charlie Gordon, Varley, White Mane, Nahanni, The House is Black

Le Poulet, Gasman, Through My Thick Glasses, Bonjour, Danny, Bonjour,

Read: Wordsworth and Coleridge, Preface (1802) to The Lyrical Ballads

TEXTS AND ASSIGNMENTS:

Readings are listed in the weekly schedule.  They are available on the internet, or from various sources in various libraries.

GROUP PRESENTATION:

Each student will be required to lead a discussion on the readings from one of the weeks on the schedule.  It will depend on enrolment, but it is likely that these will be group presentations, with two to three people speaking, together, for from 10 to 15 minutes.  Presenters must be prepared to talk about time and place, text and context, individuals and collectives.  Try to link your presentation to the theme of the week.  Your instructor will be pleased to make some suggestions in this regard.

READING RECORD:

By 5 PM on the day of class, students will e-mail the TA and tell him if they have read the assigned text, or not.

FILM RESPONSES:

Students will write 500-750 weekly words about one or two or three of the films screened in each class.  Alternatively, students may write those 500-750 words on the week’s actual topic, though if they do so, they should still probably cite individual titles.  These responses should be posted on the digital dialogue section of Learning Suite.  They are due on Monday at noon, the week following the topic in question.

For instance, or in other words, your responses to the actualities screened during our week three class are due on Monday, at noon, of week four.

FINAL PAPER:

Each student will submit a 1500-2000 word paper on the nature of canon and classic, especially as these terms have been complicated, expanded, in any way altered by our own conversations and textual experiences.  The paper is due on Wednesday, December 4.

FINAL EXAM:

Our final will take place on Thursday, December 15, commencing at 5:45 PM (really!).

At that time we will all sit down and see a short film.  Then we will write until 7:45, at the latest, on why or how or whether the film in question is great.